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dc.contributor.authorDuncan, Andrew James
dc.date.accessioned2018-10-10T01:00:14Z
dc.date.available2018-10-10T01:00:14Z
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/7996
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-2655
dc.description.abstractBritish Columbia is a rewarding region for winter backcountry travel. Studies acknowledge that compared to backcountry skiers, relatively little is known about snowmobilers as a user group, or their attitudes toward avalanche safety. This research aimed to describe the attitudes and safety habits of mountain snowmobilers in North Rockies and determine if the current forecasting service affected their backcountry travel habits. Data were collected during 2016 from 262 active snowmobile users across the Northern Rockies. Results then were compared to data-rich forecasting regions within B.C., which have been previously studied. A significant finding was a new heuristic trap that affects mountain snowmobilers termed ‘the-stuck-friend’ heuristic. Results showed little difference between snowmobiling communities with respect towards avalanche literacy, AST 1 uptake, transceiver usage, avalanche involvement and given the large discrepancy in available forecasting and viewership between north and south, infers a missed opportunity to further engage and educate mountain snowmobilers.
dc.subjectAST
dc.subjectAvalanche
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectheuristics
dc.subjectsnowmobiling
dc.subjectSnow-safety
dc.title‘BRRAAPPPING’ In the North – daily avalanche bulletins, BC mountain snowmobilers and avalanche skill training uptake
dc.date.updated2018-10-10T01:00:16Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Environmental Education and Communication
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainability
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainability


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