Now showing items 20-24 of 24

    • St. John's: The Atlantic entrance to the new world 

      O'Brien, Ken (Canadian Institute of Planners, 2000)
      St. John's was incorporated as a town in 1888 and raised to a city in 1921. In the 1950s, the city adopted its first land-use zoning by-law. A draft municipal plan was prepared in 1972, but the first adopted plan ...
    • Toronto: Evolving capital of Ontario 

      Glover, Robert (Canadian Institute of Planners, 2000)
      Although Toronto is the capital of Ontario, the provincial government is a relatively small component in the diversified economic base of Canada's largest city. Yet, a nineteenth-century decision to move the legislative ...
    • Two hundred years of planning in Fredericton 

      Forbes, Alex; DeGrace, Bill (Canadian Institute of Planners, 2000)
      Fredericton, a city which now has a population of 47,000, was established as the capital of New Brunswick in 1785. A surveyor named Dugald Campbell had considerable vision: working in the 1780s, he set aside land along ...
    • Whitehorse: The Yukon River Corridor Plan 

      Cabott, Lesley (Canadian Institute of Planners, 2000)
      The Yukon River is one of the great rivers of the world. A sixmile stretch of it known as the Whitehorse Rapids gave our city its name. Today, the river is both a source of power and a recreational playground, and ...
    • Yellowknife: Diamond capital of North America 

      Smyth, Jamie (Canadian Institute of Planners, 2000)
      The city that gold built in the 1930s and 40s has traded up to diamonds. Yellowknife is riding high on the glittering stones, with one diamond mine operating some 200 kilometres north, and another one on the way. Now ...