Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorYamaguchi, Marc Joseph
dc.date.accessioned2018-07-10T22:10:03Z
dc.date.available2018-07-10T22:10:03Z
dc.date.issued2018-07-10
dc.date.submitted2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/6335
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-1249
dc.description.abstractThe participants in this study were property owners who volunteered for involvement in a residential low-impact development (LID) initiative located in Toronto, Canada. The LID entailed the installation of rain gardens for the retention of storm water runoff in the front yards of the residents. Using a phenomenological approach based on individual interviews and a focus group, the study documented participants’ experiences of maintaining the rain gardens and their perceived changes in knowledge and attitudes concerning local actions that support sustainability. While much has been published on the implementation of rain gardens in North America, the assessment of people’s receptivity to this form of storm water intervention has largely gone undocumented. In the final analysis, the results of this study indicated homeowners are in favour of more nature at home, making rain gardens more accessible to the public, and replicating them as an adaptation strategy.
dc.subjectcommunity of practice
dc.subjectdiffusion of innovations
dc.subjectlow-impact development
dc.subjectrain garden
dc.subjectstorm water management
dc.subjectsustainability
dc.titleLow-impact development : citizen chronicles from the urban underground
dc.date.updated2018-07-10T22:10:04Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Environmental Education and Communication
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainability


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record