Recent Submissions

  • Plan Canada - Volume 39, Number 2 (May/June 1999) 

    Unknown author (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Planning professionalism|Pratique et perspectives de l'urbanisme
  • Contents 

    Unknown author (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Table of contents for Plan Canada - Volume 39, Number 2 (May/June 1999).
  • Professing planning: On the horns of the modern/postmodern dilemma 

    Wight, Ian (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Editorial article on the "Planning Professionalism" theme of this issue of Plan Canada.
  • A portrait of postmodern planning: Anti-hero and/or passionate pilgrim? 

    Sandercock, Leonie (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Many commentators have argued that the modernist planning project has failed. This paper proposes a way forward for the profession, offering a portrait of the postmodern planner as a passionate pilgrim, a tireless ...
  • Rummaging in the compost 

    Davidson, Gary (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    A commentary on the appendix of Dr. Leonie Sandercock's book, Towards cosmopolis: Planning for multicultural cities (Chichester: Wiley, 1998).
  • Towards collaboration between planning practitioners and academics 

    Witty, David R. (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    A commentary on the appendix of Dr. Leonie Sandercock's book, Towards cosmopolis: Planning for multicultural cities (Chichester: Wiley, 1998).
  • Reflections on planning professionalism 

    Seasons, Mark (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    A commentary on Dr. Leonie Sandercock's article, A portrait of postmodern planning: Anti-hero and/or passionate pilgrim, which is also included in this issue of Plan Canada.
  • Professional meets personal: Bringing the whole self to work 

    Lang, Reg (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Professional implies the provision of independent, objective, impersonal, expert opinion. The reality of planning, however, is more that that. Much everyday planning is communicative and collaborative work involving the ...
  • So, what's a profession?: And how does CIP-style planning rate? 

    Marshall, Nancy (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Popular and theoretical descriptions of professions are quite different. Professions really started to take hold in Europe during the eleventh and twelfth centuries with the formation of guilds and associations. ...
  • Teaching professional practice in Canadian planning schools 

    Curry, John A. (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    This article analyzes data from a ten-question survey which was designed to determine how Canadian planning students are taught professional planning practice. The survey, which was electronically mailed to representatives ...
  • Environmental values and professionalism in planning: A case study 

    Gowdy, Andrew; Hendler, Sue (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    This paper explores the following questions: What values do planners have regarding the environment, and how might these values help define their profession by having a presence in planning codes? Theories of environmental ...
  • Bridging the gap: Cloaking professionalism 

    Smith, Sandra (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    Musing today on a desirable "cloaking" of professionalism for planners, and whether planners should aspire to a professional title, has led me to consider aspects of my work/life "theory", created and fashioned ...
  • Beware of monstrous hybrids!: A professional planning perspective on Jane Jacobs' System of survival 

    Brown, David D. (Canadian Institute of Planners, 1999)
    David D. Brown reviews "Systems of survival: A dialogue on the moral foundations of commerce and politics" by Jane Jacobs (New York: Vintage Books, 1994).