Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVannini, Phillip
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-17T18:44:32Z
dc.date.available2018-03-17T18:44:32Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationVannini, P. (2014). Mentre tu dormivi: Traghetti e pendolari in British Columbia [While you were asleep: Ferries and commuters in British Columbia]. Lo Squaderno: Explorations in Space and Society , 32, 17-23.en
dc.identifier.issn1973-9141
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.losquaderno.professionaldreamers.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/losquaderno32.pdf
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/5610
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-550
dc.descriptionItalian and English translation. This article is published under Creative Commons license CC BY 3.0. The definitive version of record is available at http://www.losquaderno.professionaldreamers.net/?cat=165en
dc.description.abstractCultural critics have made of the commuter a modern popular culture stereotypical figure, characterized by habitual and automatic behavior. Tied to a security belt, hidden behind a newspaper, stuck inside a train coach, and linked to a cellphone or iPod, the commuter is apparently deprived of sensations, emotions, sense of place, endlessly trapped in the whirl of translocal flows. Such image is undoubtedly superficial. Recently, everyday movement practices have attracted the attention of mobility researchers. An interdisciplinary study of the intersections between bodily and virtual movement of people, objects, and information has developed (Adey 2010). The study of mobility has began to spread light on subjectivities, experiences, and the mundane practices of travellers (such as commuters) with the aim to overcome the commonsensical idea that transit zones (ranging from airport terminals to highways) are spaces without meaningful interaction. With this piece, I seek to contribute to an ethno - graphic study of mobility. More specifically, whereas a large part of research carried out so far has privileged transport means like cars, trains and buses, i turn to a relatively neglected means of mobility: ferries. Drawing on an three-year ethnography among island and seaside communities of British Columbia, Canada (Vannini, 2012), I have interpreted the experiences and practices of commuters’ everyday mobility as active space and time performances.en
dc.language.isoiten
dc.publisherLo Squaderno: Explorations in Space and Societyen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectFerriesen
dc.subjectCommutersen
dc.subjectBritish Columbiaen
dc.titleMentre tu dormivi: Traghetti e pendolari in British Columbia [While you were asleep: Ferries and commuters in British Columbia]en
dc.typeArticleen


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

  • Vannini, Phillip
    Canada Research Chair in Innovative Learning and Public Ethnography; Professor, Communication and Culture, Interdisciplinary Studies

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International