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dc.contributor.authorCox, Kieran D.
dc.contributor.authorBlack, Morgan J.
dc.contributor.authorFilip, Natalia
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Matthew R.
dc.contributor.authorMohns, Kayla
dc.contributor.authorMortimor, James
dc.contributor.authorFreitas, Thaise R.
dc.contributor.authorLoerzer, Raquel Greiter
dc.contributor.authorGerwing, Travis G.
dc.contributor.authorJuanes, Francis
dc.contributor.authorDudas, Sarah E.
dc.coverage.spatialBaynes Sound, British Columbia, Canada, http://sws.geonames.org/5895389/en
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-21T19:54:23Z
dc.date.available2017-12-21T19:54:23Z
dc.date.issued2017-11-21
dc.identifier.citationCox, K.D., Black, M.J., Filip, N., Miller, M.R., Mohns, K., Mortimor, J., … Dudas, S.E. (2017). Community assessment techniques and the implications for rarefaction and extrapolation with Hill numbers. Ecology and Evolution, 1-14. DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3580en
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1002/ece3.3580
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.25316/IR-256
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/5300
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-256
dc.description.abstractDiversity estimates play a key role in ecological assessments. Species richness and abundance are commonly used to generate complex diversity indices that are dependent on the quality of these estimates. As such, there is a long-standing interest in the development of monitoring techniques, their ability to adequately assess species diversity, and the implications for generated indices. To determine the ability of substratum community assessment methods to capture species diversity, we evaluated four methods: photo quadrat, point intercept, random subsampling, and full quadrat assessments. Species density, abundance, richness, Shannon diversity, and Simpson diversity were then calculated for each method. We then conducted a method validation at a subset of locations to serve as an indication for how well each method captured the totality of the diversity present. Density, richness, Shannon diversity, and Simpson diversity estimates varied between methods, despite assessments occurring at the same locations, with photo quadrats detecting the lowest estimates and full quadrat assessments the highest. Abundance estimates were consistent among methods. Sample-based rarefaction and extrapolation curves indicated that differences between Hill numbers (richness, Shannon diversity, and Simpson diversity) were significant in the majority of cases, and coverage-based rarefaction and extrapolation curves confirmed that these dissimilarities were due to differences between the methods, not the sample completeness. Method validation highlighted the inability of the tested methods to capture the totality of the diversity present, while further supporting the notion of extrapolating abundances. Our results highlight the need for consistency across research methods, the advantages of utilizing multiple diversity indices, and potential concerns and considerations when comparing data from multiple sources.en
dc.description.sponsorshipCanada Research Chairs Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Liber Ero Foundation; Canada Foundation for Innovation; British Columbia Knowledge Development Funden
dc.format.extent14 pg.en
dc.format.mediumtexten
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc.en
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subject.lcshSpecies diversityen
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental monitoringen
dc.subject.lcshEcologyen
dc.titleCommunity assessment techniques and the implications for rarefaction and extrapolation with Hill numbersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.noteThis is an electronic version of an article originally published as: Cox, K.D., Black, M.J., Filip, N., Miller, M.R., Mohns, K., Mortimor, J., … Dudas, S.E. (2017). Community assessment techniques and the implications for rarefaction and extrapolation with Hill numbers. Ecology and Evolution, 1-14. DOI: 10.1002/ece3.3580 Ecology and Evolution is an open access journal published by Wiley. More information about the journal can be found at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)2045-7758, and this article can be found at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ece3.3580/full.en
dc.description.fulltexthttps://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/5300/Dudas.EE.pdf?sequence=7en
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.3580
dc.identifier.doi10.25316/IR-256


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International