Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEwing, Natasha
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-06T00:03:05Z
dc.date.available2017-12-06T00:03:05Z
dc.date.issued2017-12-06
dc.date.issued2017-12-06
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/5256
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-219
dc.description.abstractThe Province of British Columbia is currently implementing a revised curriculum for the K-12 school system to provide opportunities for schools to reassess and initiate unique and novel learning programs. The Grade 9/10 Reynolds Flexible Studies Program is already a Greater Victoria School District (SD 61) “program of choice,” providing opportunities for students to be engaged with their peers, teachers, community and the environment in meaningful ways. Throughout this case study, I used several data collection methods – surveys, focus groups, and interviews – to glean a detailed understanding of the Flexible Studies Program from the perspectives of parents, teachers and students. Further, I took a phenomenological approach as a participant-observer to attempt to discover what aspects of a flexible learning environment are most meaningful to students, how they experience change throughout the program, and how they engage emotionally, behaviourally and cognitively during the year. A significant outcome of this study is a final synthesis of best practices and insights that constitute a list of recommendations that may be used for developing, designing, communicating and teaching in response to the revised BC curriculum through Flexible Studies Programs.en
dc.subjectflexible studiesen
dc.subjectnew BC curriculumen
dc.subjectnovel learning environmenten
dc.subjectstudent experienceen
dc.subjecttransformationen
dc.subjectwhole person learningen
dc.titleLearning to find a sustainable balance : a case study of the Reynolds flexible studies programen
dc.typeThesisen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record