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dc.contributor.authorPollo, Stephen M.J.
dc.contributor.authorAdebusuyi, Abigail A.
dc.contributor.authorStraub, Timothy J.
dc.contributor.authorFoght, Julia M.
dc.contributor.authorZhaxybayeva, Olga
dc.contributor.authorNesbø, Camilla L.
dc.date.accessioned2017-10-16T18:39:58Z
dc.date.available2017-10-16T18:39:58Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-11
dc.identifier.citationPollo, S.M.J., Adebusuyi, A.A., Straub, T.J., Foght, J.M., Zhaxybayeva, O., & Nesbø, C.L. (2017). Genomic insights into temperature-dependent transcriptional responses of Kosmotoga olearia, a deep-biosphere bacterium that can grow from 20 to 79 °C. Extremophiles, 1-17.en
dc.identifier.issn1431-0651
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1007/s00792-017-0956-9en
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.25316/IR-115
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/5139
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-115
dc.description.abstractTemperature is one of the defining parameters of an ecological niche. Most organisms thrive within a temperature range that rarely exceeds ~30 °C, but the deep subsurface bacterium Kosmotoga olearia can grow over a temperature range of 59 °C (20–79 °C). To identify genes correlated with this flexible phenotype, we compared transcriptomes of K. olearia cultures grown at its optimal 65 °C to those at 30, 40, and 77 °C. The temperature treatments affected expression of 573 of 2224 K. olearia genes. Notably, this transcriptional response elicits re-modeling of the cellular membrane and changes in metabolism, with increased expression of genes involved in energy and carbohydrate metabolism at high temperatures and up-regulation of amino acid metabolism at lower temperatures. At sub-optimal temperatures, many transcriptional changes were similar to those observed in mesophilic bacteria at physiologically low temperatures, including up-regulation of typical cold stress genes and ribosomal proteins. Comparative genomic analysis of additional Thermotogae genomes indicates that one of K. olearia’s strategies for low-temperature growth is increased copy number of some typical cold response genes through duplication and/or lateral acquisition. At 77 °C one-third of the up-regulated genes are of hypothetical function, indicating that many features of high-temperature growth are unknown.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a Research council of Norway award (Project no. 180444/V40) to C.L.N.; a Simons Investigator award from the Simons Foundation, a Dartmouth College Walter and Constance Burke Research Initiation Award (award no. 327936), and Dartmouth College start-up funds to O.Z.; and an Alexander Graham Bell Canada Graduate Scholarship CGS-M (Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada) to S.M.J.P.en
dc.format.extent17 pg.en
dc.format.mediumtexten
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subject.lcshThermophilic bacteriaen
dc.subject.lcshBacteria--Effect of temperature onen
dc.titleGenomic insights into temperature-dependent transcriptional responses of Kosmotoga olearia, a deep-biosphere bacterium that can grow from 20 to 79 °Cen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.description.fulltexthttps://viurrspace.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/5139/Adebusuyi.Extremophiles.pdf?sequence=5en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00792-017-0956-9en
dc.identifier.doi10.25316/IR-115


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International