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dc.contributor.authorNelson, Janet H.L.
dc.contributor.authorFriesen, Duane A.
dc.contributor.authorGill, Chris G.
dc.contributor.authorKrogh, Erik T.
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-08T22:15:18Z
dc.date.available2016-09-08T22:15:18Z
dc.date.issued2010-09-29
dc.identifier.citationNelson, J.H.L., Friesen, D.A., Gill, C.G., & Krogh, E.T. (2010). On-line measurement of oxidative degradation kinetics for trace gasoline contaminants in aqueous solutions and natural water by membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometry. Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering, 45(13), 1720-1731. DOI: 10.1080/10934529.2010.513250en_US
dc.identifier.issn1093-4529
dc.identifier.otherDOI: 10.1080/10934529.2010.513250en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/2992
dc.description.abstractMembrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS) was used to directly monitor the loss of trace gasoline contaminants (benzene, toluene, 2-methylthiophene and methylcyclohexane) in nanomolar (ppb) aqueous solutions under a variety of UV-induced advanced oxidation processes (AOP). The decay kinetics of these contaminants were followed simultaneously in “real-time” via tandem mass spectrometric techniques by re-circulating the reaction mixture in a closed loop over a semi-permeable membrane interface. The photocatalyzed degradations were observed to follow pseudo–first-order kinetics with rate constants ranging from 0.006 to 0.2 min−1 depending on the reaction conditions. We report rate enhancements for several UV-based advanced oxidative processes using physisorbed titanium dioxide (TiO2/UV, TiO2/UV/O2, TiO2/UV/H2O2) and compare these to the direct photolysis of H2O2 under otherwise identical conditions. The relative degradation rates of 4 trace contaminants are reported for reactions carried out in the same solution. The degradation kinetics were also monitored directly in a natural surface water spiked with the same contaminant suite. The observed decay kinetics in the presence of TiO2 in air-saturated natural water were similar to those carried out in deionized water. However, when the photo-oxidation was enhanced by the addition of H2O2, the degradation was markedly slower in natural water relative to deionized water due to competition for photons by dissolved organic matter. This work further demonstrates the use of MIMS as a sensitive on-line measurement technique for “in-situ” reaction monitoring of organic contaminants at environmentally relevant concentrations in complex solutions and reactive media.en_US
dc.format.extent37 pg.en
dc.format.mediumtexten
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfen
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Groupen_US
dc.subject.lcshMass spectrometryen
dc.subject.lcshOxidationen
dc.subject.lcshPhotocatalysisen
dc.subject.lcshOrganic water pollutantsen
dc.subject.lcshWater--Purification--Oxidationen
dc.subject.lcshTandem mass spectrometryen
dc.subject.otherPhoto-oxidationen
dc.subject.otherDegradation kineticsen
dc.subject.otherMembrane introduction mass spectrometry (MIMS)en
dc.title[Post-print] On-line measurement of oxidative degradation kinetics for trace gasoline contaminants in aqueous solutions and natural water by membrane introduction tandem mass spectrometryen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.description.versionPost-print versionen
dc.description.noteThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in Journal of Environmental Science and Health, Part A: Toxic/Hazardous Substances and Environmental Engineering on September 29, 2010, available online at: http://www.tandfonline.com/10.1080/10934529.2010.513250en
dc.description.fulltexthttps://viuspace.viu.ca/bitstream/handle/10613/2992/Gill.Krogh.JESHA.pdf?sequence=4en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/10934529.2010.513250


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