Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorJull, Marnie
dc.contributor.authorEnns, Jodi Leanne
dc.date.accessioned2023-01-12T02:05:49Z
dc.date.available2023-01-12T02:05:49Z
dc.date.issued2023-01-12
dc.date.submitted2023
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/26133
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-17885
dc.description.abstractThis phenomenological study explores the obstacles, motivations, supports and gaps church leaders identify as they make decisions when a complaint of emotional harm is submitted against another individual whom the leader oversees. Complaints are made against behaviours that are often nuanced and, to name a few, can include patterns of sarcasm, shaming, overly controlling behaviour, coercion, angry outbursts, or passive aggressive tendencies. A leader responding to a reported complaint encounters obstacles, motivations, supports and gaps in decision-making. Exploring case studies of church leaders, this research utilizes the Insight approach as a framework that attends to the interiority of individual decision-making within complex social contexts. Understanding how leaders make decisions in the face of a complaint of emotional harm can better equip future leaders who are required to respond to similar complaints.
dc.titleWhat do I do now? Church leader decision-making in response to complaints about one of their team member’s emotionally harmful behaviours
dc.date.updated2023-01-12T02:05:51Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Conflict Analysis and Management
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Humanitarian Studies


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record