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dc.contributor.advisorBernard, Mary
dc.contributor.authorBeaudry, Morgan Alene
dc.date.accessioned2022-08-31T01:05:36Z
dc.date.available2022-08-31T01:05:36Z
dc.date.issued2022-08-31
dc.date.submitted2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/25987
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-17746
dc.description.abstractCommercial trucking is one of the largest employers of working-aged men in North America and considered one of the most dangerous occupations. Commercial vehicles are involved in approximately 20 per cent of collisions, most of which involve passenger vehicles. Due to the size disparity between the vehicles, occupants in the smaller vehicles experience a high rate of fatalities and injuries whereas the driver of the truck typically survives or experiences physical injuries. What has not been extensively explored are the emotional and mental health consequences of such events on those surviving truckers. The effects of job-related trauma on professionals in a broad range of occupations has been explored in qualitative and quantitative studies, however, studies on trauma experienced by truckers are less abundant. Current and former commercial truck drivers conceptualized their direct experience of work-related catastrophic and fatal collisions using Photovoice, a qualitative, arts-based method combining visual and narrative inquiry that invites a phenomenological and intimate exploration of the research topic. Participants completed a weekly photo and narrative assignment for seven weeks and authored their assignment topics in weeks four through seven. The data they created indicated that truckers experience negative mental health effects post-collision along with unique challenges and barriers to recovery while also providing an exploration of related aspects of trucking culture and community. This insight could be used to: 1) inform peer and professionally delivered mental health and psychosocial interventions; 2) identify mental health as a workplace vulnerability and potential hazard in trucking; and 3) guide medical and mental health professionals on customization of services for this population. Keywords: Truckers; commercial vehicle; trauma; job-related trauma; mental health; collision; Photovoice; psychosocial supports; workplace; potential hazard; trucking culture; trucking community.
dc.titleA heavy load – conceptualizing commercial truck drivers’ lived experiences of trauma using photovoice
dc.date.updated2022-08-31T01:05:41Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineCollege of Interdisciplinary Studies


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