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dc.contributor.advisorLickers, Michael
dc.contributor.authorHead, Jolene
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-31T01:04:51Z
dc.date.available2022-05-31T01:04:51Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-31
dc.date.submitted2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/25843
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-17609
dc.description.abstractAs a Government of Canada priority, Reconciliation has become a common topic among Federal Public Servants. However, how many know what Reconciliation means and looks like? Many examples indicate that governments, academia, and the private sector are making efforts to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. In this paper, Reconciliation, decolonization, and the use of Indigenous knowledges in the Public Service are explored. The focus is on how Executives, deemed to be positional leaders in the Public Service, can deconstruct colonial practices and take meaningful action toward Reconciliation. Based on the research and data collected from Federal public servants, barriers were identified and recommendations that Executives can implement to become Reconciliation leaders in the Public Service. The research indicates that far too many public servants remain ignorant of Indigenous Peoples’ reality despite Canada’s commitment to implement the Truth and Reconciliation Commission’s Calls to Action. Executives ignorant of these realities can create barriers that hinder Reconciliation efforts. Further, the Public Service system and its culture also hinder Reconciliation. These factors make for a challenging work environment for Indigenous public servants and negatively impact relationships with Indigenous Peoples. It was concluded that Reconciliation has become politicized, decentering Indigenous Peoples from the narrative. Unfortunately, the Public Service cannot effectively address large-scale change efforts like Reconciliation; however, Executives play a critical role in influencing change in the system as they set the tone and culture in the organization. Therefore, they are a vital ingredient in the success or failure of Reconciliation in the Public Service. Decolonization of the Public Service is also a necessary step toward Reconciliation, which includes a culture change inclusive of Indigenous knowledges. It is recommended that clear direction by the Clerk of the Privy Council to the Public Service on Reconciliation would spur Executives into action to decolonize the Public Service creating a culture shift that normalizes Reconciliation and the utilization of Indigenous knowledges in the workplace. Adopting new leadership skills, including non-Western and Western theories, will support Executives in their Reconciliation and decolonization efforts. Actions such as these create a safe and inclusive environment for Indigenous public servants while also improving the relationship with Indigenous Peoples more broadly.
dc.subjectDecolonization
dc.subjectIndigenous knowledges
dc.subjectLeadership
dc.subjectPublic Service
dc.subjectReconciliation
dc.subjectWâkôtowin
dc.titleDeconstructing colonial practices in the federal public service
dc.date.updated2022-05-31T01:04:54Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Leadership
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Leadership Studies


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