Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisorDodd, Matt
dc.contributor.authorIreland, Grant Daniel James
dc.date.accessioned2022-05-05T01:03:38Z
dc.date.available2022-05-05T01:03:38Z
dc.date.issued2022-05-05
dc.date.submitted2022
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/25758
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-17527
dc.description.abstractThis study focused on predicting hydrocarbon emissions that may lead to nuisance odour complaints, specifically in Alberta’s Peace River Oil Sands areas. These emissions were calculated from monthly gas production flow rates into the closest heavy-oil production systems to the odour complaint locations. The distribution of odour complaint occurrences and their distances (between receptor and source and the source’s nearest resident) were reviewed; and the air dispersion of two odourants, n-butane and hydrogen sulphide, were modelled under three distinct weather scenarios. The study found that operations managers could not employ the developed research procedure to predict hydrocarbon nuisance odours from their production systems; however, the results would assist in understanding the precursors that lead to hydrocarbon nuisance odours from production systems.
dc.subjecthydrocarbon emissions
dc.subjectnuisance odours
dc.subjectodour complaints
dc.subjectodours management
dc.titlePredicting hydrocarbon nuisance odours from petroleum storage tank emissions
dc.date.updated2022-05-05T01:03:40Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. in Environment and Management
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainability


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record