Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFoster, Maia
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-01T19:07:42Z
dc.date.available2021-09-01T19:07:42Z
dc.date.issued2021-09-01
dc.date.submitted2021
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/24501
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-16323
dc.description.abstractThrough qualitative semi-structured interviews with host community partners, this thesis explores the effects of hosting three different groups of First Nation evacuees on a single host community, the City of Timmins, as well as potential improvements to address negative impacts and experiences for the host community and evacuees. Hosting partners experienced challenges around a lack of familiarity with evacuating communities, language barriers, inadequate substance use and mental health supports, assumption of large costs, and access to deployable provincial supports. Findings demonstrated that the needs of evacuees during precautionary and emergency evacuations are distinct, necessitating agile hosting plans. Recommendations for hosting partners are provided based on the interview findings. Further considerations for improving host community capacity include sharing lessons between host communities, conducting further collaborative research, encouraging relationship building between host communities and First Nation representatives, simplifying provincial standards, and applying lessons from existing research, community studies, reports, and commissions.
dc.subjectDisaster Management
dc.subjectEmergency Management
dc.subjectEmergency Response
dc.subjectEvacuation
dc.subjectFirst Nation
dc.subjectHost Community
dc.titleHosting with humility : Timmins’ 2019 host community experiences
dc.date.updated2021-09-01T19:07:45Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Disaster and Emergency Management
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Humanitarian Studies


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record