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dc.contributor.authorO'Higgins-Wilson, Jane
dc.date.accessioned2020-04-07T19:02:31Z
dc.date.available2020-04-07T19:02:31Z
dc.date.issued2020-04-07
dc.date.submitted2020
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/23131
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores the communication of tsunami warning information and its influence on residents’ evacuation behaviour during the January 23, 2018 tsunami warning event in British Colombia. The experiences of residents of the communities of Masset and Ucluelet were examined in a multiple-case study guided by propositions from existing literature in hazard warnings and risk communication. Findings support the importance of pre-event communication and information from peers and the local authority, as well as the connection between the level of risk perception and evacuation behaviour. Receiving a higher number of warning messages was not found to be related to a greater likelihood of evacuation. Masset residents were found to have evacuated less frequently than Ucluelet’s residents, even though Ucluelet suffered more problems with communication efforts that night, suggesting that messaging faults can be mitigated by strong social capital and pre-event communication.
dc.subjectEmergency Management
dc.subjectEvacuation
dc.subjectTsunami
dc.subjectWarning
dc.titleTsunami warning communication and its relationship to evacuation in Coastal British Columbia
dc.date.updated2020-04-07T19:02:33Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Disaster and Emergency Management
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Humanitarian Studies


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