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dc.contributor.authorManuel, Richard Murray
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-30T22:10:52Z
dc.date.available2019-09-30T22:10:52Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-30
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/17238
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-9577
dc.description.abstractThe World’s newest nation, South Sudan, is struggling to hold itself together. The Canadian government has recognized the need to aid the population as the country attempts to right itself; and yet, doing so without engaging the nation’s government. The country has been likened to a derelict boat run by untrained officers and inexperienced crew. There is a need to both keep the passengers safe and train the crew. Without building capacity in the officers and crew the global community is condemned to providing aid at infinitum. To board the ship and take over without the blessing of the officers, is an act of piracy no matter how well intentioned. Just as semaphore is an outdated method of communication, the Canadian government must find new ways to communicate with and fund service providers who are seeking to help this fragile state become more robust.
dc.subjectCapacity building
dc.subjectDevelopment
dc.subjectGAC
dc.subjectInter-agency communication
dc.subjectNGO
dc.titleLike semaphore in the dark : there must be a better way to communicate
dc.date.updated2019-09-30T22:10:54Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Intercultural and International Communication
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Communication and Culture


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