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dc.contributor.authorFriedley, Katherine Joan
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-17T04:00:35Z
dc.date.available2019-09-17T04:00:35Z
dc.date.issued2019-09-17
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://viurrspace.ca/handle/10613/16582
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-8950
dc.description.abstractThis study examines the relationship between multi-day nature-based outdoor programs, resilience development, and divorced women between the ages of 40 and 60. The overarching purpose of the study was to determine what elements to include in outdoor programs to positively affect resilience development in middle-aged divorced women, and to determine an evaluation basis for such programs. The study is underpinned by Richardson’s (2002) metatheory of resilience, the third wave of which focuses on effective motivation of internal resources to foster resilience development. Six divorced women between the ages of 41 and 58 participated in a weekend outdoor program which took place in the Canadian Rockies in late November 2018, as well as pre and post interactions over several months. The study used narrative inquiry methodology contextualized within action research methodology (Clandinin & Connelly, 2000; Herr & Anderson, 2005; Wicks, Reason, & Bradbury, 2008; Given, 2008). It employed pre-adventure semi-structured interviews, online and telephone conversations, personal observations, in-session journaling exercises, a post-adventure focus group interview, and pre- and post-adventure resilience measurements (Liamputtong, 2011; Wagnild & Young, 1993). Analysis of the individual narrative inquiries identified disruptive factors (program elements), resilience catalysts (opportunities provided by the program for disruption), and areas of resilience development, illustrating a positive relationship between the program elements and resilience development for each participant. Resilience scale measurement results contradicted the narrative results in two of six participants, showing a decrease in resilience post-adventure, illustrating resilience domain specificity (Infurna & Luthar, 2018; Luthar, 2015), and highlighting the need for future studies to examine resilience transference (Neill & Dias, 2001).
dc.subjectDivorce
dc.subjectHealing
dc.subjectMiddle-aged women
dc.subjectNature
dc.subjectOutdoor programs
dc.subjectResilience
dc.titleInto the back 40 : middle-aged women, divorce, resilience, and outdoor programs
dc.date.updated2019-09-17T04:00:36Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineCollege of Interdisciplinary Studies


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