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dc.contributor.authorTrapper, Lillian
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-16T04:00:18Z
dc.date.available2019-07-16T04:00:18Z
dc.date.submitted2019
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10613/13327
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.25316/IR-7588
dc.description.abstractThe study creates a procedural framework for establishing positive long-term working relationships around principles of consent among others between an individual Indigenous family and a gold mining company to deal with conflicting interests. The focus of the research is my family’s territory and sustaining our Cree lifestyle. The study identifies the main elements that make up a framework to continue and improve our Cree lifestyle and to create a setting for collaboration between my family and the gold mining company. The research may contribute to other First Nations and their governance processes such as internal consultation processes with their citizens and to help them conduct proper engagement. The framework may also assist resource developers and all governments to become aware of and better understand Indigenous land stewardship systems in the James Bay area. Finally, the outcomes of this research may shed light on the difficulty in defining processes to address and consider consent. Keywords: Indigenous family, gold mining, customary land tenure, cultural sustainability, procedural framework
dc.subjectcultural sustainability
dc.subjectcustomary land tenure
dc.subjectgold mining
dc.subjectIndigenous family
dc.subjectprocedural framework
dc.titleCreating a procedural framework for restitution between an indigenous family and gold mining company in Northeastern Ontario
dc.date.updated2019-07-16T04:00:20Z
dc.language.rfc3066en
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Environment and Management
dc.degree.levelMasters
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainability


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