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dc.contributor.advisorVannini, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorStirling, Bridget
dc.date.accessioned2017-01-06T18:28:45Z
dc.date.available2017-01-06T18:28:45Z
dc.date.issued2017-01-06
dc.date.submitted2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/963
dc.description.abstractThis thesis looks at collective identity formation within the Occupy movement through an ethnographic study conducted over the autumn and winter of 2011-2012 at three sites, including New York, New York; Victoria, British Columbia; and Edmonton, Alberta, with an examination of problems of frame resonance with the major movement boundary frame of a collective 99%. The conclusion offers a way forward for new social movements through a shifting network of solidarities rather than an attempt to create a stable, unified collective identity across a broad range of movement actors.en
dc.subjectcommunicationen
dc.subjectethnographyen
dc.subjectframingen
dc.subjectidentityen
dc.subjectoccupyen
dc.subjectsocial movementsen
dc.titleOccupying identities : hierarchal divisions and collective identity in the occupy movementen
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Intercultural and International Communicationen
dc.degree.levelMastersen
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Communication and Cultureen


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