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dc.contributor.advisor
dc.contributor.advisor
dc.contributor.authorJones, Shelley
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T01:07:59Z
dc.date.available2016-06-06T01:07:59Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/895
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.20360/G22C7J
dc.description.abstractAuthentic literacy activities engage children with meaningful reading and writing (Duke, Purcell-Gates, Hall, & Tower, 2006), but little investigation has been conducted into the relationship of the kinds of writing children enjoy and the authenticity of the writing activity and experience. This paper reports findings from a study that investigates the question: How, if at all, does authenticity factor into kinds of writing that children like and/or dislike? Findings indicate that children enjoy writing that purposefully engages them with the real world, and is therefore authentic, and do not enjoy writing that they perceive as merely "school work".en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherLanguage and Literacy Researchers of Canada
dc.subjectStudies
dc.subjectWriting
dc.subjectChildren & youth
dc.subjectLiteracy programs
dc.titleAuthenticity and Children’s Engagement with Writingen_US
dc.typeArticle
dc.identifier.doi10.20360/G22C7J


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