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dc.contributor.advisorMoran, Jonathan
dc.contributor.advisorDodd, Matt
dc.contributor.advisorLing, Chris
dc.contributor.authorStephens, Christopher Mark
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-06T01:26:19Z
dc.date.available2014-11-06T01:26:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-11-05
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/762
dc.description.abstractMany of North America's 250 species of Neotropical migrant songbirds have declined in the 20th and early 21st centuries. Forest fragmentation can introduce limiting factors to bird habitats as edge to interior ratios increase with potentially harmful related impacts. Avian habitat fragmentation research is biased towards Eastern North America. A breeding study of the coastal population of Swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatus ustulatis) in the Georgia Basin was conducted with the research question: What effect does forest patch size have on Swainson's thrush breeding territory selection? Four forest patches representing a broad range of sizes were used, with control for additional environmental variables. Exhaustive avian sampling in the breeding season focused on density, abundance and habitat use. There were statistically significant causal relationships between forest patch size and total avian density and abundance. Density increased in smaller forests while total abundance declined. The study also covered the management implications of the research findings.en_US
dc.subjectAvian Ecologyen_US
dc.subjectBird Habitaten_US
dc.subjectHabitat Fragmentationen_US
dc.subjectNorth American Birdsen_US
dc.subjectOrnithologyen_US
dc.subjectSwainson's Thrushen_US
dc.titleForest patch size and breeding territory selection by coastal swainson's thrush (Catharus ustulatis ustulatis) in BC's Georgia Basinen_US
dc.degree.nameM.Sc. in Environment and Managementen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainabilityen_US


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