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dc.contributor.advisorWalinga, Jennifer
dc.contributor.advisorReal, Michael
dc.contributor.advisorFetner, Tina
dc.contributor.advisorVannini, Phillip
dc.contributor.authorJayatunge, Sadhna
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-01T23:19:39Z
dc.date.available2014-08-01T23:19:39Z
dc.date.issued2014-08-01
dc.date.submitted2014
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/740
dc.description.abstractThe literature contains much debate about the living wage, but few studies focus on faith activism. Since the living wage debate began in the late 1800s, Christian practice has led the movement culture of the western working class. This paper develops a new conceptual approach to measuring the positive characteristics of faith activism's role. As a result of shifting towards neo-liberalism, workers have lost job security and bonds they had with their employers. Analysis of the deteriorating economic, political, and psychological situations for workers highlighted that grassroots political power is essential for the working poor to reclaim dignity. The efficacy and legitimacy of faith organizations have amplified the living wage debate and influenced public policy. Using a comparative case study of successful living wage campaigns in Europe and North America, both a framework and a practical demonstration of interfaith activism in the living wage movement are provided.en_US
dc.subjectChristian Social Ethicsen_US
dc.subjectCommunicative Actionen_US
dc.subjectFaith Activismen_US
dc.subjectIn-Work Povertyen_US
dc.subjectLiving Wageen_US
dc.subjectSustainable Coalitionsen_US
dc.titlePromoting living wage in Hamilton : a comparative case study of faith-based activismen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Professional Communicationen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Communication and Cultureen_US


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