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dc.contributor.advisorCran, Gregory
dc.contributor.advisorGuilar, Joshua
dc.contributor.advisorChristie, Kenneth
dc.contributor.advisorVannini, Phillip
dc.contributor.advisorWalinga, Jennifer
dc.contributor.authorTuchel, Daniela
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-17T21:41:25Z
dc.date.available2013-05-17T21:41:25Z
dc.date.issued2013-05-17
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/592
dc.description.abstractThis thesis explores how fear is used as a communication strategy to create and enhance power in conflict setting. I drew the data from six in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted in northern Uganda, a region that was ravaged by war for over two decades, as well as from my own experiences of fear in the field, because terror shaped the very nature of my interactions in Uganda. Building on symbolic interaction theory, the analysis explores how the participants created the meaning of "fear" through symbols, culture, language and experiences during and after the war and how fear was used as an agent of control externally and as a dis-enabler internally. The findings support the idea that fear, perceived or otherwise, is strategically important because of its influence on conflict outcomes.en_US
dc.subjectChild soldiersen_US
dc.subjectConflict communicationen_US
dc.subjectFearen_US
dc.subjectLord's Resistance Armyen_US
dc.subjectPoweren_US
dc.titleFear and power in Northern Uganda : a symbolic interactionist approachen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Intercultural and International Communicationen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Communication and Cultureen_US


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