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dc.contributor.authorMoran, Jonathan A.
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Charles M.
dc.contributor.authorHawkins, Barbara J.
dc.date.accessioned2013-03-05T03:40:40Z
dc.date.available2013-03-05T03:40:40Z
dc.date.issued2003-07
dc.identifier.citationMoran, J. A., Clarke, C. M., & Hawkins, B. J. (2003). Carnivore to detritivore? Isotopic evidence for leaf litter utilization by the tropical pitcher plant Nepenthes ampullaria. International Journal of Plant Sciences, 164(4), 635-639. doi:10.1086/375422en_US
dc.identifier.otherdoi: 10.1086/375422
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/576
dc.identifier.urihttps://doi.org/10.1086/375422
dc.description.abstractNepenthes pitcher plants trap prey in specialized leaves formed into pitchers. Most lowland species live in open, sunny habitats and capture prey to obtain nutrients, principally nitrogen (N). Nepenthes ampullaria is commonly found under closed canopy forest and possesses morphological traits that indicate adaptation to trap leaf litter as a nutrient source. We tested this hypothesis by comparing foliar stable N isotope abundance (δˆ15N) between plants growing under forest canopy at 20 sites (litterfall present) and those growing in 20 open areas (no litterfall) in Borneo. Foliar δˆ15N values were significantly lower and total N concentrations were higher for the plants with access to litterfall. Using a mixing model, we estimated that N. ampullaria plants growing under forest canopy derived 35.7% ± 0.1% of their foliar N from leaf litter inputs.en_US
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.publisherInternational Journal of Plant Sciencesen_US
dc.subjectBorneoen_US
dc.subjectCarnivoryen_US
dc.subjectN isotopesen_US
dc.subjectNepenthesen_US
dc.titleFrom carnivore to detritivore? Isotopic evidence for leaf litter utilization by the tropical pitcher plant Nepenthes ampullariaen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.identifier.doi10.1086/375422


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