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dc.contributor.advisorZandvliet, David
dc.contributor.advisorKool, Richard
dc.contributor.advisorNoble, Michael-Ann
dc.contributor.authorCirkony, Constance Lee
dc.date.accessioned2013-02-05T23:37:52Z
dc.date.available2013-02-05T23:37:52Z
dc.date.issued2013-02-05
dc.date.submitted2013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10170/566
dc.description.abstractThis study explored how British Columbia K-12 teachers incorporate environmental education (EE) into their teaching practice. Using a mixed method design with surveys and interviews, I applied grounded theory method to understand teachers' experiences. Teachers applied infusion, integration, and interdisciplinary approaches in most grades and many subject areas. Teachers' rationale and philosophy supported their practices, implying strong teacher and student engagement. The more a teacher modified the school curricula and infrastructure, and collaborated with the education community, the more the EE course or program was likely to become embedded within the school culture. The experiences of these environmental educators can serve as a model for education transformation by identifying challenges and support systems, and demonstrating the importance of how teaching rationale and philosophy sustain innovative practices. The findings are of interest to BC teachers, administrators, school districts, the Ministry of Education, and organizations that support teachers.en_US
dc.subjectBritish Columbiaen_US
dc.subjectenvironmental educationen_US
dc.subjectimplementationen_US
dc.subjectintegrationen_US
dc.subjectinterdisciplinaryen_US
dc.subjectpedagogyen_US
dc.titleEnvironmental learning in British Columbia : a grounded theory exploration of teachers' practicesen_US
dc.degree.nameM.A. in Environmental Education and Communicationen_US
dc.degree.levelMastersen_US
dc.degree.disciplineSchool of Environment and Sustainabilityen_US


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